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PAPERBACK BOOKS

A HISTORY OF ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH

AND CONGREGATIONS IN GYMPIE 



history of zion lutheran church

This book traces the history of the Zion Lutheran Church in Gympie, with an emphasis on its congregations. 

The history traces the Church from its beginnings in 1858 on the Gympie goldfields, to 1911 when it was built originally as a Congregational Church, to being dedicated as a Lutheran Church when the whole property was purchased for £700, to its dedication as the Trinity Lutheran Church in 1942. 

In 1966 there was an Australia-wide amalgamation of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Australia (ELCA) with the United Evangelical Lutheran Church of Australia (UELCA) to form the Lutheran Church of Australia, (LCA). This union also occurred in Gympie when the constituting meeting of the new combined Gympie Congregation was held on 6th January 1967. 

On 3rd February 1967, at the second meeting of the Gympie Congregation,  A Zillman moved and Albert Sinn seconded that ‘Gympie Congregation be named Zion’.  

With the inspiration of pastors and congregations of the past, and assuming that, given the opportunity, could Zion possibly be inspired with the same ‘going and growing’ attitude as God’s people as those long-ago Christians obviously were? The author believes that the Gympie Christians, going right back to the Gympie goldfields’ time, have proven that they were willing and able to ‘have a go’.

In Store Price: $29.95 
Online Price:   $28.95

 

AMAZON

EBOOKS
Ebook version - $AUD9.00 upload.

 

ISBN: 978-1-922229-14-4
Format: Paperback
Number of pages: 205
Genre: Non Fiction

 

Cover: Clive Dalkins


Author
-
Nolene Stark
Publisher: Zeus Publications
Date Published:  2018
Language: English


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     Read a sample:    

 

CHAPTER ONE

PART 1 – IN THE BEGINNING

 

1868

 

As they file into their pews on any Sunday morning, few members of the present Zion Lutheran congregation would be aware that the Gympie Gold Rush, in no small way, played a part in the formation of events that led to the building of Jameson Memorial Congregational Church, which, later on, became their own Zion Lutheran Church.

 

Excerpts from a paper on GYMPIE GOLDFIELDS by the Rev L C Jamieson

In the month of July 1868, being just some nine months after the discovery of gold by Nash, the Rev Daniel Mossop visited Gympie with the view of establishing a Congregational Church in the new settlement, which promised, through the energy and enterprise of the miner, to become a place of considerable importance.

Already a large population had been drawn together from all parts of Queensland and the Southern Colonies, Victoria being largely represented, by the exciting news of rich alluvium and quartz reefs which were daily opened, and hill and valley for a radius of several miles were occupied by tents, bark huts, paling humpies, and their primitive erections hurriedly being raised as a shelter by the hardy pioneers.

Soon after his arrival upon the field, Rev Mossop commenced evangelistic or church work. The use of Messrs Perkins & Co’s store, situated on Commissioner’s Hill, was granted in which to hold services.

The result of these services was the forming of a committee to take steps for the establishment of a church based on Congregational principles; and in the first instance a temporary building was erected at The One-Mile, at the cost of some £10, upon the site then occupied by the Phoenix Prospectors’ mining plant, and in this place divine service was held for a few months; but, subsequently, a more comfortable building and one of larger dimensions was built on Palatine Hill* – a site that was then considered more central, but which, with the expansion of the field, proved to be otherwise; besides being somewhat difficult of access, especially after nightfall.

 

* {I believe that our current Zion Lutheran Church is situated on Palatine Hill.}NDS

   

I found this picture of ‘Congregational Church’ Gympie, above on the left, in the historical section of Gympie Library. As it claims – could this have been the Congregational Church built in 1868 by the early miners on the present site of our Zion Church? 

According to a paper on GYMPIE GOLDFIELDS by the Rev L C Jamieson: 

In the first instance a temporary building was erected at The One-Mile, at the cost of some £10, upon the site then occupied by the Phoenix Prospectors’ mining plant, and in this place divine service was held for a few months; but, subsequently, a more comfortable building and one of larger dimensions was built on Palatine Hill ... which obviously would have been in 1868.

 

This building shows weatherboard external cladding. Comparing it to the picture of the old hall behind the church, taken in 1937, approximately 69 years later, the hall behind the church in 1937 had no external cladding and was lined inside of studs, (the church pictured above right, taken in 1937). According to John Rackemann, who remembers attending this church – 

The photo of the church and hall is how I recall it from about 1950. The original hall was immediately behind the church, with several steps up into the hall starting just a few feet clear of the existing concrete slab / roof at the back of the church. An old large gum tree stood at the rear of the hall, the stump of which was visible near the old BBQ for many years. It was the custom in the early days to have a combined lunch in the hall with the several families who attended church. The gum tree at the back of the hall would certainly tie in with my memories of the tree and the position of the stump which was at the side of the car park / new hall for many years until the village was developed.

Both pictures have a very big gum tree in approximately the same position, and to me appear to be the same tree, showing a similar branch jutting out about one third of the way up the trunk.

The gum tree seems to me to be exactly like the gum tree beside the church in 1937 – but possibly taken from a different angle. Was there another hall behind this one? Another suggestion was: When the new church was built in 1911, (now our Zion Church) could they have kept just the back half-section of the old church – containing the last three windows?

 


 

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